The Smaller Seekings

Polytheist, witch, trans, gender variant, queer, white, ADHD, kinky, librarian, writer... and a whole lot more.

romakast:

They go weak in the knees and get short of breath when you bring up the topic of jars.

(via milkywitchguts)

theultraintrovert:

byeboi:

bialogue-group:

New Documentary Highlights Discrimination Within the Black Lesbian/(and Bisexual) Community

The Same Difference is an hour-long documentary about lesbians who discriminate against other lesbians and bisexual women by Nneka Onuorah, an associate producer for BET.

“It’s almost like a gang,” Onuorah tells ELIXHER. “This is the criteria. This is what you have to do or you’re not a part of it, you’re not in it, or you’re not real. I thought that was ridiculous” … she wanted to start the conversation and shed some light on those issues …

So far, the teaser has been well received. The LGBT community wants to see it because they are living this every day…

Her fundraising goal is $15,000 and the money raised will go to production costs for her to complete the film. Onuorah does not want to only get the major city perspectives that are always seen. She wants to talk to people in states like Utah, Arkansas, and Washington … she also wants to make sure the message is heard by everyone, not just the lesbian community.

“It’s the same difference,” she says. “It’s not like we [lesbians] just face discrimination or we discriminate against each other and have stereotypes. This happens in the African American [heterosexual] community. From culture to culture, we’re doing this to each other. You can take the ‘lesbian’ out of the film and it will still be as powerful”The Same Difference is sure to spark a national dialogue around identity and the way we police one another. Give what you can to help make this important film happen. Donate here.

Yasss more Queer POC representation in film! I do not have funds personally, but will signal boost!

BOOOST!

(via queerblackbuddhist)

floodxland:

passionforwolves:

if you’re sad just watch this wolf gif. look at it.

who’s a huge big vicious apex predator?WHO’S A BIG SILLY? :D

floodxland:

passionforwolves:

if you’re sad just watch this wolf gif. look at it.

who’s a huge big vicious apex predator?

WHO’S A BIG SILLY? :D

(via asperqueer)

victoriousvocabulary:

FATIDICAL

[adjective]

having power to foretell future events; prophetic; fatiloquent.

Etymology: from Latin fātidicus, from fātum, “fate” + dīcere, “to say”.

[Tom Bagshaw - Cassandra]

(via hedgeandherbs)

abwatt:

doubleadrivel:

did-you-kno:

Source 

I’ll take two.

I went to a conference on learning and the brain once, to help teachers understand how the latest brain science could help us become better teachers.  The two pieces of the brain I learned the most about during those two days were the Hippocampus and the Amygdala — and it turned out that those two pieces of information have been the keys to my best teaching days in the last six years.  Any time I forget these pieces of information, I have a bad class or a bad day or a bad week. Any day I remember these pieces of information, I have a great class — and chances are, my student will, too.

Want to know them? Here they are:

1) The amygdala takes all the sensory data you receive, and analyzes it based on two themes, every 6-8 minutes. The two questions it asks of the data are “Am I safe? Am I having fun?”  If the answer to the first question is no, it immediately turns off the brain’s connections to the front hemisphere of the brain — where all the learning happens; the person relies exclusively on the back-brain, where well-learned responsible operate from. So if a kid doesn’t feel safe in school, the kid won’t learn anything.  If the answer to the first question is yes, the amygdala asks the second question, and if the answer is no, I’m not having funthe brain begins rooting around looking for some way to create novelty and entertainment, even if that entertainment puts others at risk.  So if a kid is having fun, she’ll learn the material presented, but if she isn’t, she’ll create disruptions, including disruptions that cause other people not to feel safe — and thus shut down their learning. So you can work with “class clown” kids who keep things on topic, but you have to get kids out of the room who behave in ways that make other kids feel unsafe.

That’s number 1.

2) The Hippocampus controls three things: position in space/time (it keeps track of where you are and what ‘time-ish’ it is there), short-term memory, and long-term memory. In other words, the key to knowing some piece of information is remembering where you were when you learned it.  It turns out that the ancient storytellers, seers, and lawyers were right, too, and you can use Palaces of Memory to keep track of things you must remember, and navigate through your memories by tracking in what sort of place you stored them. The really cool thing about this is that your palace of memory can be a real or a fictional place — the hippocampus doesn’t care if it’s being fed false sensory data or true sensory data — if you close your eyes and ‘remember’ standing in your hometown public library, and you go over to the shelf where your mental copy of Beowulf is stored, you have a much better chance of recalling word-for-word quotations than if you just close your eyes. You still have to do the hard work of memorizing the quotation, but remembering the place you memorized it may help bring the memory back even if you forget.

And that’s what I learned at the Learning and the Brain conference.

(via sonneillonv)

voiceofnature:

Shades of green, in the local woods

voiceofnature:

Shades of green, in the local woods

(via runehermit)

asperqueer:

persistent-technician:

asperqueer:

helbows:

Introducing the Social Intelligence Test! From what I can tell, it’s sponsored by Harvard and it’s rather interesting. The basis is you look at pictures of people going through different emotions and decide what emotion they’re feeling. The trick is, you can only see their eyes.

How well can you read people? I never thought I was good at it, but I scored rather high on this test. It was a very interesting experience! I highly recommend taking this!

ok i really fucking suck at this test
i used to think i didn’t
then i took it and i was like


'i am crey'

*aspieproblems*

Interestingly, I do just fine on these tests… I guess because I learned how to read these things from TV or movies or something.

But I CANNOT look people in the eyes, or really at their face too much period, offline. Just straight up can’t, it’s like having a dementor suck out my soul.

OMG i just retook this test for funsies

and it was super uncomfortable

but i got like an 85% which is really high apparently

thanks art school, for teaching me what eyebrows mean!

but i could still tell i was processing it in a non-automatic way. like i would be thinking “ok, eyebrows up, that’s usually positive, but nose is crinkled soooo… .” it’s like doing math or something :P

micdotcom:

23 women show us their favorite positions

When reality television star and fashion blogger Lauren Conrad was asked what her “favorite position” was on a live radio program a while back, the women listening held their breath. Although we take great pride in the work that we do, most of us could relate to being undermined and belittled publicly at work. When Conrad cleverly retorted “CEO,” it was hard not to aggressively high-five our laptop and mobile devices. The words “hell” and “yeah” could be heard all across the nation.

1 in 3 women has experienced some form of sex discrimination at work | Follow micdotcom 

(via sonneillonv)